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Sleepyjk

I want to learn how to Tune Standalone ECU's (EFI Controllers)

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Reluctors which is a seriously out of date term (inductive devices) like capacitive devices are designed to be connected into a loaded circuit to produce an appropriate signal shape.

Correct loading is used to shape an output signal the rise time . It's not just about the voltage , its about the noise, the threshold and the rise time of the signal , whether it triggers on the positive going or the negative , all of these and numerous other factors all come into play.

Loading of the device controls the resonant "Q" and makes the output more consistent - creating the correct circuit Q is a science like a lot of things in tuning - piecing them all together is skill and experience.

Messing with them without the science is exactly that, just messing around- If you understand the science you have a better chance of understanding the process.

No disrespect to the crunch but black arts are practiced by those who know some of the science and wing certain parts.

Gurus are people who know all the science and work within their expertise.

Ah please correct me but the sensor on a M20 crank is called a reluctor pickup

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Buy a megasqurt system and have fun. It's a steep learning curve but if I could do it, anyone can. Good luck.

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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"Reluctance" is a characteristic of some electric motors and magnetic circuits , the name "reluctor" provides some insight in to what the device actually is.

It is an electro-magnetic inductive device.

If we know and understand what the device actually is we can model and apply it effectively.

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Buy a megasqurt system and have fun. It's a steep learning curve but if I could do it, anyone can. Good luck.

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

That would learn you a fair bit. The deep end has always been my favourite way to learn, for better or worse ahem....

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"Reluctance" is a characteristic of some electric motors and magnetic circuits , the name "reluctor" provides some insight in to what the device actually is.

It is an electro-magnetic inductive device.

If we know and understand what the device actually is we can model and apply it effectively.

Come on, that's pretty trivial isn't it?

Do you call the toilet a ' white porcelain excrement collector' so you can get a better understanding of what it is so you can model your poo properly in it?

Let's get back to talking about learning how to tune.

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"Reluctance" is a characteristic of some electric motors and magnetic circuits , the name "reluctor" provides some insight in to what the device actually is.

It is an electro-magnetic inductive device.

If we know and understand what the device actually is we can model and apply it effectively.

Your sort of making it tad more complicated dude, in ref to using them on the Haltech ecu a clamp is required based on their high output voltage lets not complicate life for the guy im sure he'll get the idea in due course

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Youv'e got it arse about face.

The clamp (or some other shaping circuit) is actually required to convert the inductive pickup signal from a sinusoidal form to a square wave which is what the Haltech and other computers are looking for.

The REASON inductive pickups have high output voltage is so you can DO this. It is not a problem of the device is is how it has been designed to achieve what you need. The clamping circuit produces a Pseudo square wave with reasonable rise time.

The sharper the rise time of the square wave the more accurate the timing is - this applies to all devices / sensors used for event timing

If you used a hall effect or optical pick up you do not have this issue as they both produce square wave signals directly, the latter with much quicker rise times and therefore more accuracy.

Knowing what the devices are and how they work is part of tuning - there is no point in selecting devices that don't provide the required signal or programming parameters your sensing devices can't support .

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No Ash I don't --- equally I don't call a Vacuum cleaner a Hoover or Electriolux .

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nope i had it right as per the ecu instructions , to change a reluctor signal to square wave requires a converter to which the sprint 500 doesn't do they do however allow you to select inductive or hall effect IF they were the same then it wouldn't have selection for.

And non of this is helping the poster in anyway he hasn't got a ecu to start with let alone needing to know the finer details, if at all they become a issue so rather than trying to show how big your wang is let the guy progress

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Please dispense with the demeaning comentary, Your post disputing what I outlined actually confirms what I outlined .

You select inductive trigger so the sine wave is shaped - it shapes and limits it to emulate a square wave which is what the Hall effect device provides.

When you select the hall effect option you are bypassing the above shaping as it is not required.

Where a processor does not have the ability to process the large sine signal , you can use an external signal conditioner to produce a voltage limited square wave.

Knowing what signals you have and what signals your processor accepts is highly relevant -- Knowing what signal conversions are possible is potentially useful .

We did this at school in the 1970's with analogue processors - it's not new and has been used in radio since the 1920's

Perhaps you would like to calm down and be less antagonistic as your practical experience and my technical expertise might then chuck out stuff the guy is capable of understanding and be of benefit to other forum users --------- have a nice day !

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legend

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I quite like the look of the new Haltec systems ... Seems very well put together / supported. One day I might even run the s50 off the new elite.

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I just had a look at the Haltech Elite for the first time. I eyeballed the stats vs what I've been focused on (Link) and other than having CAN which can talk to the car they look really similar. And the Haltech is $$$ compared to the Link (G4+ Xtreme), especially with the looms ... but ...

... I get the feeling my view reflects my limited knowledge. I guess what I am saying is that choosing an ECU for a complicated engine must be complicated. And that's before you even try and tune it. Arriving at an optimal tune for variable cams must take ages.

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What sort of budget do you have for an ecu? If learning is the most important part about the ecu get a megasquirt. To be more specific get a ms1v3. They are cheap, you will run into problems that'll take you to distant parts of the internet. It'll really help your problem solving ability as well. And finally you can upgrade it to a ms2 or ms3.

Another cheaper and more challenging option is speeduino. It is an arduino based ecu that uses the same tuning soft ware as ms(tunerstudio).

A link g4 atom is a pretty cheap locally supported option (or I've got a link g4 extreme for sale for a little bit more).

If your looking at a haltech ecu you should also check out life ecus. But at this stage you're looking at quite a good chunk of money. If you want to spend more I can continue.

I've only had experience with early and g4 links and megasquirt ecus, everything else is just going off features and online reputation

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What sort of budget do you have for an ecu? If learning is the most important part about the ecu get a megasquirt. To be more specific get a ms1v3. They are cheap, you will run into problems that'll take you to distant parts of the internet. It'll really help your problem solving ability as well. And finally you can upgrade it to a ms2 or ms3.

Another cheaper and more challenging option is speeduino. It is an arduino based ecu that uses the same tuning soft ware as ms(tunerstudio).

A link g4 atom is a pretty cheap locally supported option (or I've got a link g4 extreme for sale for a little bit more).

If your looking at a haltech ecu you should also check out life ecus. But at this stage you're looking at quite a good chunk of money. If you want to spend more I can continue.

I've only had experience with early and g4 links and megasquirt ecus, everything else is just going off features and online reputation

I have a $1500.00 budget, but nothing is set in stone.

So far it looks like main deciding factor is user preference (aftercare, software, and etc).

Bottom Line, still on the fence.

Edited by Sleepyjk

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You should try downloading the software and having a play. That's totally free and you can learn a fair bit about how the ECU works.

In fact, that's all I have done (so take anything I say with a grain of salt). That and connect a rotary switch and verify I can run through boost targets.

Edited by CamB

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