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this is only fair.The more people who pay all their taxes the better of we will all be.They need to simplify the system ,get rid of the shelters,make EVERBODY pay their fair share.Why can the wealthy arange their affairs to pay minimal or no tax) whislt the "poor" cant avoid any tax.In the long run the individuals tax payments may drop

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1 hour ago, polley said:

Not a new tax if you just increase existing taxes eh.

Oh has it gone up? 

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On the "new tax" thing:

If something wasn't taxed, and is now taxed, whether something else already had that tax applied or not is irrelevant, it's a new tax on the good/services you're acquiring.

But anyway, all this will do for me is lift the burden of managing the $400 limit. If I pay GST so be it, I'll still be paying less than buying locally in a lot of cases (unfortunately).

 

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15 hours ago, zero said:

Only difference between the two is Labour campaigned on no new taxes.

In their first year.  That's passed hasn't it.  Prepare yourself for the next 2.

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6 hours ago, Driftit said:

In their first year.  That's passed hasn't it.  Prepare yourself for the next 2.

No - in their first term.

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14 hours ago, zero said:

No - in their first term.

Haha no no I think you all misheard them.  They said first year.  Donald Trump tactics.

That's not my voice, signature, video saying that it was the first term.  It's the fake media....  It's Nationals Tax.  So it doesn't count.  😵

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It'd be easy to say "but National would have..."
But Labour did say no new taxes.
Sadly, I suspect that reality really hit home once they were the main party in power and had a better grip on the country's finances. And the reality is that more money is needed for the country. Overseas investment has tended to be of the one-off buy land variety, which is unpopular. Overseas income from dairy sales has fallen as world dairy market prices have dropped, and (like it or not) a situation has been manufactured in NZ where we have become dependent on that income.

So the 'normal' streams aren't there to support the infrastructure changes the country needs. New streams can be created, but that takes time, and Labour don't have time. They have to be seen to act now.

So we get to suffer.

 

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like for this.

A $100 million investment to tackle homelessness and support people in urgent need of housing this winter.................. So one night a bunch of nice people went out and counted all the homeless people in Auckland and could only find 380 which didn't fit their forecast so doubled it and added some for good measure 800. true story.

Or This

$1.8b to deliver more teachers, better professional development, more learning resources, and help the sector meet the rising costs they face each year. 

and the list goes on.

we're being tax to keep NZLP promise.

wasn't there a $5.5 billion surplus mentioned a couple of weeks back.

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57 minutes ago, richard said:

wasn't there a $5.5 billion surplus mentioned a couple of weeks back.

Sadly, that was after all the infrastructure to support the changes to fuel taxation had been implemented. So... Scrap the changes and be criticised for wasting money on implementing the infrastructure, or continue, and be criticised for the changes. Damned if you do; damned if you don't.

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this is straight out of NZLP May 2018 fiscal summary , no mention of a short fall that would require a tax hike on fuel......And their $11-21 billion tax hole that everyone's forgotten about.

 

 

We are looking to the future and taking responsibility on a number of intergenerational challenges facing New Zealand. The responsibility includes more than just policy choices – we are committed to fiscal responsibility to ensure that the New Zealand economy can withstand any unexpected shocks like natural disasters or global downturns.

The Treasury’s Budget Economic and Fiscal Update shows the Government is meeting the Budget Responsibility Rules. These rules include running sustainable operating surpluses across the economic cycle, reducing net core Crown debt to 20 per cent of gross domestic product (GDP) within five years of taking office and keeping government expenditure as a per cent of GDP in line with historic trends.

New Zealand’s fiscal and economic outlook continues to improve. The operating balance before gains and losses (OBEGAL) is forecast to reach a surplus of $7.3 billion in 2021/22. Net core Crown debt falls to 19.1 per cent of GDP in 2021/22. Unemployment declines towards 4 per cent, wages rise in real terms each year, and GDP growth is expected to average 3 per cent across the forecast period.

The Government’s responsible approach to fiscal management, together with an improved economic outlook since the general election, means we have been able to increase the capital and operating allowances in Budget 2018. These will begin to address the social and infrastructure deficits facing New Zealand, while meeting the Budget Responsibility Rules. Budget 2018 provides for $2.8 billion per year of new operating spending and $3.8 billion of new capital investments.

Allowances for future Budgets have also been increased in light of continuing cost pressures across a range of portfolios. Budget 2018 forecasts a record $42 billion of net new capital spending over the next five years. This is over $10 billion more than planned by the previous Government at Budget 2017.

The Government’s plan is fully funded within the allowances. It will ensure New Zealand transitions to an economy that is more productive, more sustainable, and more inclusive. It is a plan focused on improving the living standards and wellbeing of all New Zealanders, both now and into the future.

 

 

 

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getting off topic, but since it was brought up, 

I dont know why there is this continued delusion that services are underfunded in new zealand except for education, which genuinely is on the bones of its ass.

Its a spending problem in Roading, there is no accountability between the contractors and the NZTA, thats why they are ripping up the Kapiti and Waikato Expressways to do it all again. 

Its a spending problem in Health, we do not need 22 DHBs for only 5 million people. consolodate procurement and management, and there would be all the money in the world to give the nurses thier fair share.

the list goes on.

technically. this is not a new tax, it has always been there. its just not viable to collect. nothing has changed, so now you are spending more money to collect than the revenue it generates.

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On 10/22/2018 at 8:10 PM, kiwi535 said:

this is only fair.The more people who pay all their taxes the better of we will all be.They need to simplify the system ,get rid of the shelters,make EVERBODY pay their fair share.Why can the wealthy arange their affairs to pay minimal or no tax) whislt the "poor" cant avoid any tax.In the long run the individuals tax payments may drop

avoiding paying tax is illegal for everyone, including the wealthy. 

and bear in mind that over 40% of working kiwis recieve more from the state than they pay into it, whether it is working for families, accomodation suppliments, acc, a free education and health system and so forth. the number is far higher when you then look at people over thier life time from birth to death.

Im not saying for one second that the poor have it good, but its the wealthy that are the only net taxpayers

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7 hours ago, _ethrty-Andy_ said:

avoiding paying tax is illegal for everyone, including the wealthy. 

and bear in mind that over 40% of working kiwis recieve more from the state than they pay into it, whether it is working for families, accomodation suppliments, acc, a free education and health system and so forth. the number is far higher when you then look at people over thier life time from birth to death.

Im not saying for one second that the poor have it good, but its the wealthy that are the only net taxpayers

that true andy but the system is too convoluted and there should not be any means to avoid tax...the sytem makes it legal but it should not be so imho. it should be a wider and flatter system

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12 hours ago, _ethrty-Andy_ said:

avoiding paying tax is illegal for everyone, including the wealthy. 

Evading paying tax is illegal for everyone, the distinction is important because 'tax avoidance' has a specific meaning (and it's legal).

 

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It's all meaningless anyway as putting "tax" and "fair" in the same sentence is what the blue or red team do to try and get our votes, it is a meaningless platitude designed to convey nothing except good feels. Policy by bumper sticker, if you will.

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the term.

minimize your tax exposure springs to mind.

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A friend of a friend was ranting about how the rich in NZ pay loads of tax to support those too idle to work.

Curiously she had no answer to a suggestion that the very rich typically pay an equivalent of a much lower rate of tax (at least) than an average working person, because the very rich employ people to help them not pay tax.

It's sad, but there are very blinkered people on both sides of the major political divide, those that genuinely believe 'their' party can do no wrong. It's a great shame that those people can only end up disappointed and disillusioned.

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Everyone has the opportunity to practice tax efficiency  (minimisation). Pay an accountant, or if you’re claiming poor just read and understand the rules that are freely available on the IRD website.  You can even call the IRD to verify your understanding; they’re very helpful.  It’s not exciting work, though foregoing a few nights in front of the goggle-box to understand how to structure your affairs efficiently can pay dividends.  Pardon the pun.  

I’m certain that the great proportion of NZ residents believe in paying their fair share of taxes.  Ensuring one pays the right amount - not too much, not too little - is not purely the preserve of the uber-rich.

The NZ media love to push this left-wing “all rich people are nasty tax-dodging citizens” agenda, I’m amazed it continues to be lapped up.

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25 minutes ago, Olaf said:

Everyone has the opportunity to practice tax efficiency  (minimisation). Pay an accountant, or if you’re claiming poor just read and understand the rules that are freely available on the IRD website.  You can even call the IRD to verify your understanding; they’re very helpful.  It’s not exciting work, though foregoing a few nights in front of the goggle-box to understand how to structure your affairs efficiently can pay dividends.  Pardon the pun.

A lot of people don't realise that you don't have to be self-employed to offset income-related expense against your due tax.

And whatever you do - do not pay to have a potential tax refund evaluated and paid to you. That's a rip-off.

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1 hour ago, gjm said:

A lot of people don't realise that you don't have to be self-employed to offset income-related expense against your due tax.

And whatever you do - do not pay to have a potential tax refund evaluated and paid to you. That's a rip-off.

why do you say it like its a disease.

That's the part I don't get, Public employee's get money from the government that is tax  from private  company's and the people that work for them.

 

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56 minutes ago, richard said:

why do you say it like its a disease.

That's the part I don't get, Public employee's get money from the government that is tax  from private  company's and the people that work for them.

Eh? Sorry - really not at all sure what you're getting at.

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9 hours ago, gjm said:

A lot of people don't realise that you don't have to be self-employed to offset income-related expense against your due tax.

 

How long has this being the case?

I haven’t worked in NZ full time since 2012, but both jobs, one as a mechanic at two franchises, and the other as a line haul truck driver, there was no mention of claiming expenses against income tax (tools, PPE, meals when staying away etc). 

 

I’m working in Aus since 2012 as a mechanic. I can claim tools, cell phone, laptop, prescription glasses, over night allowance & out of zone allowance (breakdowns), vehicle, health insurance, any training/tickets/ licences and associated costs. 

Each end of financial year I get between 10-20% back in tax. 

As an employee i don’t think this happens in NZ? 

 

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14 hours ago, gjm said:

And whatever you do - do not pay to have a potential tax refund evaluated and paid to you. That's a rip-off.

No; it's a service.  You have options, and can make a choice.  If the service was uncalled for, market economics would spell its demise.

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1 hour ago, Olaf said:

No; it's a service.  You have options, and can make a choice.  If the service was uncalled for, market economics would spell its demise.

It's a service that exists only to prey on the uninformed. Those who don't know that IRD offers the exact same service for free online. 

Their advertising makes it out like they have a point of difference to the free online service, but they don't. 

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9 hours ago, huff3r said:

It's a service that exists only to prey on the uninformed. Those who don't know that IRD offers the exact same service for free online. 

Their advertising makes it out like they have a point of difference to the free online service, but they don't. 

Are lawyers in the same category?  I mean, you can get legal aid for free...

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