Leaderboard


Popular Content

Showing most liked content since 03/02/2017 in all areas

  1. Some more (better) photos...
    9 likes
  2. Four of my favorites from my collection happen to have been born in 2001. E39 M5, E46 M3, Z3 M Coupe and X5 4.6is
    8 likes
  3. After selling the E91 and driving the E39 for a while I felt like I needed something a bit newer again and had my sights set on a 135i coupe, looking for the perfect one to pop up. But it was always either not quite right and or a bit too expensive. Then I stumbled across this E87 130i hatchback 2010 automatic and couldn't say no to the lovely 6 cylinder engine so pulled the trigger. Picked it up completely stock and have already started the mods like new wheels (Work Japan 18x8.5), debadged and black grilles etc. Huge list of things I want to do on it but so far very happy with the car and will be replacing the E39 as my daily.
    7 likes
  4. After prevaricating, considering the market and options, TermiPete's 545i became available. The domino effect of upgrading! I'd thought about X5's, missed out on a 535d Motorsport Touring by 2 days, and thought about 550is. So I bought this. It's my SS Commodore. Just in a sharply tailored german suit, rather than a Drizabone. And it has a roundel where the lion would be. And it's cool. Pete has lavished a bit of attention on this vehicle since acquiring it in Oct 2015. Now its my turn. I've already ordered hardware for shock replacement (bump stops, boots, strut bearings, bolts etc)... now deciding which shocks to get. Sachs standard (OEM) Bilstein: Touring (B4), HD (B6), Sport (B8) Koni Yellows After doing the shocks on three of my last four cars, the last two I've stuck with factory IEM spec Sachs (my Volvo 855-T5 and BMW e46 Touring). I'm not planning on changing the springs on this 545i and don't want to radically transform or make it too hard. It has Standrard suspension, it's on 18" conventional tyres (no need for RFT's here as it has a spare), and has Dynamic Drive option (the active computer controlled anti-roll bars) and having driven a near-identical car without DD, I'm sold on it. Koni Yellows I'm sure would be lovely, but they're a little more pricey. Bilstein: tempted to go HD (B6 Yellow), they're said to be made to work with stock springs but are up to 20% stiffer. I think this would be similar to the addition of KYB Excel+ gas shocks to my old A32 Maxima. Firmed it up and helped it hugely with roadholding and ride. Alternately B4 Tourings are said to be 10% stiffer than stock. Sachs: The OEM shocks are equivalent to 31316766993 (Front left) and 31316766994 (Front right), and 33526766995 rear. They'll no doubt "just work". Would I be crazy to go Bilstein HD B6? And as soon as the shocks are done, it's time for new boots (and panties). Photos soon.
    7 likes
  5. Hi Guys, this is my M5. I've owned a long list of mainly E34's but this is the best one, even the original floor mats are still secured with unbroken plastic lugs. It is essentially a 1 onr from new, the original onr purchased it brand new in HK & bought it here in 1995. He sadly passed away and the president of the BMW club appraised it & passed it on to the dealer principal at Claytons & he sold it it to me. Anything else of interest about the car?? With regards the movie Ronin, the car used was a manual 525i(M50 engine). Listen to the exhaust tone as it slides around,deep M50 tone & it has the std white needle dash. rgds Mr E34. edit: forgot to add it came with the original turbines & throwing stars(personally not fond of either)
    7 likes
  6. And most recently, after discovering that my clutch fluid had leaked onto the carpet due to a broken clutch master, I decided it was time to whip the carpet out yet again. With the water blaster sitting right there, I thought bugger it. Time for some cleaning!! Two days later it was dry and it was time to get the vinyl die - at least that would hide some imperfections! It appears I had company while reinstalling...
    7 likes
  7. Answers in order: 1. Yes 2. Agreed 3. Hell no! I'd already gotten a taste for BMW as the e30 was first released; I still remember getting a short drive in a (UK import) 323i in early '83... and when I saw a head-on accident in Wellington CBD between an e30 and a HiAce courier van that left the courier van a steaming smoking write-off, and the doors still opened and closed on the e30, I was impressed. I had an A32 Maxima for a while, I'd not have wanted to hit anything in that! More recently on some of the family weekend trips I've taken in the last year, we've driven past accidents with the meatwagon still in attendance, often a compact Japanese or Korean hatchback where there's no longer a back seat area. I look at my wife and say "that's why we're spending more than we'd like servicing these euros. I'd never forgive myself if we'd made a conscious decision to drive something small, light, and built to a (small) budget, and one of the family was seriously injured in an accident.
    7 likes
  8. What nobody is factoring into the equation, including the people that made the decision, is the cost of storing and maintaining all the information required for the key. Plus all the controls you have to have in place around people accessing the information. I don't mean the cost of the physical storage to hold the data, that is relatively cheap these days. More the processes and steps that have to be followed and the time and cost it all takes. It's always easy for these bodies to say "you must keep records" "you must provide information" "you must have spare parts" but they have no clue about the costs to the business to make these things happen.
    6 likes
  9. Freshly painted feet for the M5. Posing with 8M3.
    6 likes
  10. I had mine done on the X5 (by TidyCar) and it was a huge improvement - $150 but no clear coat - they didn't think clearcoating was a good plan for some reason. Anyway, as of today I'm the proud owner of an E60 M5 - Silverstone II with black leather and Alu trim. Epic and ridiculous vehicles. Time to sell my 545i!
    6 likes
  11. First start video! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HxD8lW_wjNo Excuse my enthusiasm, I was just extremely excited to finally see everything come together after months of work. But all is not perfect, the engine wont idle by itself. It runs great when we manually give it a bit of throttle. We swapped out both the ICV and MAF from other vehicles, but still no idle. I'm thinking the TPS may be water damaged. But we ran out of time, and had to head back to Christchurch for work the next day. At this stage I've got a few problems to solve before the first drive. The steering column doesn't clear the already chopped rear exhaust manifold. I'll probably just get a Holden Astra or similar steering U-joint setup from pick-a-part. The intake manifold appears to be just resting on the brake booster ever so slightly. I think I'll just add some washers on the engine mounts to lift the engine a few millimetres. I need to make a bracket to support the clutch fluid reservoir. The audi brake fluid reservoir clears the throttle body and intake manifold, but doesn't leave any room for a vacuum line to run down to the booster. I'm going to order a smaller reservoir from a Mk2/Mk3 golf which should solve the problem. I need to grab a throttle cable that will work. (probably from an E36) Fingers crossed, I'm hoping to take the car for a drive next weekend.
    6 likes
  12. Finally got a WoF! Now to paint and seal so the rust won't come back.
    5 likes
  13. Sold the e34 v8wagon off to its new owner down south will miss the soundtrack
    5 likes
  14. go oem mate.well done dont lower it,daily drivers need to be user friendly as well as friendly to user!I think you will find you have a lot more car in a 5 series than a three series.Once you get the shocks done it will be very nice.The commy may be a better car than most people expect but a 6 speed auto will make all the difference.Look at the acelleration for "overtaking"The beemer kills the commodore,and it will be the gearbox that makes the difference.
    5 likes
  15. snapped - using iPhone and 645PRO, with a tweak or two in Lr - this morning while I was out for a drive.
    5 likes
  16. Sorry about the pictures not sure what happened there heres a few different ones
    5 likes
  17. 5 likes
  18. No idea what it is, but I'm near certain it should be turned up to 11.
    5 likes
  19. just a small update on this one. haven't used it much lately updated the wheels to some 17" BBS ones . fitted a arm rest still yet to fit a the ac condenser my dad visited nz last month from OZ so I let use his old car
    5 likes
  20. 4 likes
  21. And time for a quick update. Replaced the fuse box. Old: New: Jumble of wires: Wasn't too bad, just labeled and de-pinned them, the popped the tabs back out and re-inserted them all. Did it over a weekend (but would be an all day type job) Just a quick pro-tip, make sure the labels are firmly attached to the wires when you label them. I had a few fall off, so had to get the old wiring diagrams out. Haven't blown a fuse so far, and now my windows work with the door open as designed. Did a compression test on the M52, and it's down a bit on the rear 2 cylinders. As it's burning through probably 500ml of oil every 1000km, it's time to swap in another engine that I picked up reasonably cheap. It's pretty much a year ago I started swapping in the current one, though this one looks to be in much better shape (no sludge built up in the head), and should be complete over the weekend.
    4 likes
  22. Update #13 So this weekend marked a corner in that we were putting things back onto the car, instead of taking them off We started by reinstalling the fuel tank - no issues this time, 20 minutes and it was in With the fuel tank hooked up and strapped in place, we turned our attention to the subframe. Originally our intention had been to assemble the rear axle out of the car, and then lift it into place. We evaluated that option, and decided it wasn't for us. The amount of weight involved, and our lack of a transmission jack, resulted in us deciding to assemble on the car. One of the challenges with rebuilding the rear axle is getting everything positioned and torqued appropriately. With the bushes, etc. it's important that they are torqued in their normal (e.g. their position when the car's on the ground), as the control arm and trailing arm bushes are pinched in position when torqued, and you don't want to torque them in an incorrect position and have them pre-loaded when the car's sitting on the ground. To this end, we did a lot of measuring to ensure that everything was set in the right locations when the bushes were torqued up. Subframe back in the car: Next up was the diff. We filled the diff with the SAF-XJ diff oil, and lifted it into place with the assistance of a dolly and a jack. Diff on the dolly (prior to being set on the jack): Here's a couple of pictures of it magically back in place: Next up after the diff was reinstalling the hand brake cables, then it was on to the trailing arms... We were initially going to mount the output shafts to the diff, and then put the trailing arms on. Then we realised mating the output shaft spline to the hub means some wrestling. To that end we pressed the output shaft into the hub, and installed the trailing arm and output shaft in one go. Again there was much measuring and positioning to ensure that everything was installed and torqued up in the "normal" position. Before long things were looking like this: Note that in the above photo, the hub is NOT in the "normal position", it is somewhat lower (or higher, depending on how you look at it) than the normal position - resting where it is cause that's how long the block of wood is With the trailing arms in, it was time to get the sway bar in, before the springs, etc. start making things really difficult. Getting the end links on is the hardest part - we ended up using the press to provide a little extra leverage. Even so - getting the sway bar in was slightly more challenging than intended - but a bit of tactical positioning of the end-links and we were away. Then it was in with the spring and spring pads. Note the sway bar in, but hanging loose - to allow us to drop the control arms enough to get the spring in: Then it was in with the shocks. We adjusted the Koni's (half a turn from full soft to start with) and put together the strut assembly. New bump stop and protective cover: At the top end it's new shock mounts & associated hardware, plus the reinforcement plates for extra security. Here's a pic of the shock installed: And the sway bar reinstalled: We also did some extra bits and pieces: Carbon filter cover back on. Rear heat shield back on. Level sensor reinstalled. During the week Dad is going to reinstall the brakes, and I'll get some new lock nuts for the hubs (the eagle eyed amongst you may have noticed they're not torqued up yet!). Then next weekend it will be on to disassembly on the front (we'll do driveshaft, exhaust, etc. at the end). The plan at this point for the front is to do disassembly, cleaning, rod bearing shells, cleaning and painting of parts in parallel, and then reassembly. Hopefully the front will be a bit of a quicker process than the rear has been For now - I'll end with a few more photos:
    4 likes
  23. So finally the parts arrived to finish the timing chains, I installed new oil squirters then proceeded to install the timing chains, when I removed all the guides from the old engine stripping it down I could have swore the guides were alloy with plastic coatings, turns out they are all rubber and just gone very hard and turned to plastic along with the two bushes holding the plastic guide on the right of pic two... Moving along, the head gasket rings sat pretty close to the bore in places i had to file some of the gasket off at the locators on top of the block to get it to sit just right as the pistons come just above deck and didnt want any interference. I still can't get over how big the ports are on these heads, it's making me think about the exhaust mani that I've got, I'm going to have to do some serious die grinding to match ports Cylinder head torqued 35nm 70nm then 105nm Rolled the engine over then went to look at the oil pump then remembered that the pump I is probably in a bad way, I pulled it apart and found very bad scoring and pitting all through it, so went though our stock and found a m52 pump that had a pump wheel, I then found to mount it I had to slot the rear bolt hole about 4mm inwards, also swapped the spring and sleeve from the m3 pump into the m52 so the insides remain the same sort of, I swapped the sprockets over and tig welded the nut to the sprocket and to the shaft, job done On the top part of the cylinder head applyed some lock tight red sealant replacing the o-rings in between then proceeded to install the cams then I remembered someone saying I have to run a cam trigger wheel on one cam and didn't get any trigger wheels from vac motorsports, they are really expensive so figured I try make one, as there is a 2mm spacer with spline that goes on the end of the cam shafts between the sprocket plates I figure that seens as there is 2mm I can reduce the spacer to 1mm and then cut one of the trigger wheels 1mm from the mating face then I get my 2mm and everything will line up apart from my cam sensor, the trigger will sit 1mm closer inwards to the head as it used to sit after the spacer, I may be able to space out the sensor with a washer time will tell. Last photo I just sat the covers on, sh*t these engines are cool 🤣
    4 likes
  24. Update #12 Couple of weeks since I last updated here! After epoxying the plates and waiting for them to set they looked like this: Notice how the epoxy has turned purple now that it's set! Cool visual indicator... Really pleased with how the epoxy process has gone. We got good beads around the edges of the plates, without too much excessive spill, meaning we got the quantity of epoxy about right. With the epoxy set, we next cleaned up the plates and excess epoxy with the die grinder, cleaned the surface with acetone, and then undercoated the bare metal surfaces with PA10. Once the PA10 undercoat layers were done, we seam sealed all the edges. This left things looking like this: I won't claim to have done the world's most professional job with the seam sealer, the finish isn't perfect, but it is completely functional. With the seam sealer drying, we moved on to pressing the new bushings back into everything. First up was the subframe. We used my friend's 6 ton press to press the subframe bushes - given it fit in the press. We used a turned brass puck to spread the load across the surface of the bushing. And hey presto! In short order, the subframe looked like this: The front diff bushing was a PITA. Used the same process as getting it out. Took ages. Glad I don't have to do it again for a long time. We did the upper control arms in the press as well - all pretty straightforward, and with the trailing arms we did the bushes and the ball joints using the threaded-rod approach. They all went pretty smoothly - no major issues. Didn't get photos of everything, but here are the trailing arms: And here's the subframe, with upper and (new) lower control arms reattached: It's all coming together During the week, Dad got some colour-matched top coat for the now reinforced RACP mounts. Here's the end result - very pleased indeed with how it's turned out. It was a process that I wasn't planning on having to go through, but having done it I can say it went much smoother and easier than I was anticipating, and I'm really happy with the end result. There's a couple of touch ups still to do with the top coat, but really pleased with how it's looking. Then there was last weekend. Putting the fuel tank back in. It was a comedy of errors and circumstances (I didn't see it as a comedy at the time ). Steps to repeat our experience on Saturday. Decide to put fuel tank back in car. Observe that the hose clamps you have on order for the fuel tank haven't arrived. Decide to go to automotive store to get short length of hose to replace the piece you had to cut to get it off, and hose clamps. Get to automotive store and discover entire retail area is closed due to power cut. Drive through terrible traffic (because of the power cut no traffic lights are working) to another automotive store. They didn't have what you wanted anyway. Go to racing supplies store who very kindly give you the piece of hose you need for free. Go to marine store who have hose clamps. Go home. Discover that BMW didn't note on the technical diagram that one hose clamp is smaller than the rest -_-. Go back to Marine store. Go home. Get fuel tank under car and start hooking everything up. Notice that a piece of hot weld has bounced across the garage and landed on fuel return pipe. Note that fuel pipe has hole in it. Decide that today was not the day for fuel tank installation. Give up. TL;DR: Sometimes it's better to just stay in bed. On the plus side, that's the biggest problem we've had this entire project. Dad picked up a 6x1 joiner on Monday, and hey presto, fixed. We'll wrap it in foam before reinstallation so it's not vibrating about. And here's a couple of pics of the fuel tank before the attempted installation, along with the replacement piece of hose. During the week Dad also assembled the rear brake callipers: Parts ready to assemble: Piston, seal and dust boot installed: Ready to install guide bushes: Guide bushes installed: So definitely getting there. This coming weekend will be fuel tank installation :shifty: and reassembly of the rear end. Meaning that the weekend after we'll be onto disassembly of the front end.
    4 likes
  25. 4 likes
  26. 4 likes
  27. Time to sell,move on to so mething else. Completely standard 1996 EVO M3 sedan 3.2 litre 6 speed manual Byranz Metallic, the only known BMW in NZ in this colour. Standard wheels, interior etc 194000 km Been very well maintained by myself and previous owners. 20K or a deal with a 2002tii or something similar.
    4 likes
  28. So im on the move.........whoop whoop!!!!! So now to be on the look out for a place to live in the coming months, looking forward to meeting a few of you local wellingtonians
    4 likes
  29. That really is a beaut. I don't think E39s get any better than that without stepping into an M5. Really hope that goes to a forum member - especially a Welly one 🙂 GLWS!
    4 likes
  30. i bought my e70 3d Msport with 20ks on the clock and have kept a record of the servicing to date incl replacement of tyres etc. it has gone through 2 sets of tyres and 2x changes of brakes (rotors & pads) All servicing done at Auckland City BMW with 1x brake change at BM Workshop as BMW could not fit me in. Cost to date for the last 6 years has come to $10,500. its an awesome truck that i will probably drive to the ground, albeit being tempted a number of times to upgrade to the new F15! Just cant justify the depreciation and the fact that its never let us down!
    4 likes
  31. New Shoes and a fancy wheel alignment that uses Lasers.
    4 likes
  32. So after ALL the hype.. it was just a broken seal 😂😂😂 soz for the anti-climax. Still need to book in for a legit full service now though and keep my girl happy haha. Oh my picture is upside too.. my bad.
    4 likes
  33. 4 likes
  34. http://www.trademe.co.nz/motors/used-cars/bmw/auction-1289930000.htm someone buy this.. deserves some bimmersport love
    3 likes
  35. Had the opportunity to whip the front sway bar out of the Saab now known as Marie-Antoinette and cook up this little piece of carbon & sticky stuff- new bar about 40% stiffer than donor bar . Put a bit more effort into detailing this one and colour coded it to match Koni struts
    3 likes
  36. Nice car, although I may be biased! Pretty much a twin of my one. I replaced the interior wood trim with silver trim from my old sedan and the wider rear rims as the tourings aren't staggered. Also I think the genuine m sport front bumpers are around $1200 from memory, we had one replaced via insurance after someone backed into us.
    3 likes
  37. Hi My names John and I purchased this Oxford Green 1999 M5 about a month ago. There were some posts on this car over Xmas and in Jan. Just letting you know it has gone to a good home. I am really enjoying driving it. Trying to only drive in the weekends but just can't help taking it for the occasional mid week evening drive. Cheers BMW Front Right BMW Left Rear BMW Front Seats BMW Rear Seats BMW Wheels
    3 likes
  38. Would be a cool project. A big job however. Have you done an engine swap before? Must consider these parameters: Custom engine/gearbox mounts - how to design them, what they will be made from etc Positioning the engine as far back and low as possible while keeping the driveshaft angle within the fine tolerance the joints require. Setting the position to dictate where the manual shifter will sit is also something to consider. Custom driveshaft modification to adapt to the 560 trans prop. Engine oil sump, M73s are a front type so would clash with the subframe / steering rack. Custom engine headers, stock ones might work, but often don't without modification. Need to also factor in the steering shafts proximity on the drivers side. Might be reasonable space given its a 60 deg block. Wiring wiring wring Fuel lines, power steering and coolant lines, fairly simple but depending on fittings you'd have to have some custom made to suit (namely power steering lines. A 330i is a good option in M spec trim as you already have the bigger axles, 188mm diff, larger hub bearings and brakes than the smaller engine models. That said I think the 325i, 328i get similar specs afaik. Budget and cost is the other factor, doing this properly wouldn't give you much change left out of $20,000. My own personal thoughts say that for the amount of work required there are better options than an M73B54 engine, while the V12 aspect is unique and interesting, it's fairly low on power for a 5L engine, 320hp isn't a lot in a heavy E46 body, that said, the torque is pretty good at close to 500nm, so it will shift but to what degree of excitement? Keep in mind they only rev out to 6000rpm so aren't a screaming V12, more so a lazy big 6 cylinder given their signature exhaust note. Wish they were more like the Ford/Aston 5.9 V12! For more performance gains, at a lesser cost and with bolt in options you could use: S54B30 M3 engine. Would bolt in. Supercharging (twin screw) M54B30 would yield excellent cost effective results. V8 LS swap using parts from Vorshlag USA header and mounting kit. Supra 2JZGTE, an easy 400hp / 500nm powerhouse without really doing a lot.
    3 likes
  39. the main point is, if you had to flip heads/tails... and one of you got to drive the '04 545i from Wellington to Auckland, and the other drove the '04 SS Commode, you'd both arrive at pretty much the same time, and feeling about as relaxed as each other. The SS is still a great trip car.
    3 likes
  40. That's the "but darling, I am trying to sell it, I've got it on TradeMe and everything..." approach to car sales if ever i have seen it!
    3 likes
  41. Damn that's a lot of car for the money, BMWs can be such a bargain!
    3 likes
  42. If I read correctly, every member that replied to your thread offered constructive advice. You are just being too pig headed to take it my friend.
    3 likes
  43. You wont be disappointed stepping into a V8 believe me. In fact it will be hard to go back . Oh and don't get too obsessed with 'fuel gauge' watching, as I often say "its not how much it costs to fill a tank that matters. it's how fast you empty it . In all seriousness enjoy your BMW SS Commodore and I'm sure it'll tick all your boxes!
    3 likes
  44. Awesome score Olaf! Proves that dominoes do fall in all the right places
    3 likes
  45. You'll not find anyone going to a dealer and paying $10k for an e46 anything, unless it's an M3! You mentioned receiving no bids at $6500 on Trademe... why would you think anyone wants to pay $8k for it, based on your earlier experience? I should like to point out that your perspective is at odds with selling *anything*. You state "it's about value for money for me, not about adding on maintenance..." Actually it's about the perception of value that your potential purchaser gains while considering your car. In this case, it's about what they're prepared to pay, rather than what you think about its value. You speak of "no value in secondhand BMWs". They're not an investment, they're a mobile liability like any other car. Disheartened on the whole BMW experience? That's all down to your perspective. Try a different lens! I wish you luck in gaining the price you seek. It's a very tidily presented 330i. GLWS.
    3 likes
  46. Just bought a set of PS4's. Got them for $1420 fitted and balanced. 245/40/18 and 275/35/18 sizes. Coming from Pilot Super Sports these seem to be every bit as good, particularly in the recent Auckland rain.
    3 likes
  47. 3 likes
  48. Nice. I have one of these on the wish list for next car - thinking blue with 6 speed manual.
    3 likes
  49. Update #11 So last weekend we didn't get too much done. Dad and I went to the Bruce Springsteen gig in Auckland on Saturday night SO GOOD! We did get a few bits and pieces done before we went... We swapped out the transmission mounts, and took the opportunity to clean up the support bracket, etc. at the same time. Here's the bracket and mounts as they came off the car: And here's a pic of the bracket & mounts back on the car. Bracket was bead-blasted to clean it up, and the mounts are new: The second thing we got done was fitting the new seals on the diff and reassembling. The diff body has been painted, the rear cover has been bead blasted, and in the input and output flanges have been painted as well: And today was RACP reinforcement plates day! First up we did a test fit of all components, and a dry run through of the process. Then we started with cleaning up the surfaces that the epoxy will be applied to. We put the finished plates into an acid pickle: While the acid did its work we got onto cleaning the RACP. The mounting areas had previously had the paint and underbody protection cleaned up as part of the manufacture of the plates, but they still need a final clean up before they're ready for the epoxy. We cleaned up the surfaces with a sanding disk on the die grinder, and then cleaned the surface with 5 rounds of kitchen roll and acetone (ensuring to clean from the centre out, so as to not drag dirt from the edges onto the clean surface. You can see in this photo that there is some residue from the paper towels, we used a lint-free cloth to clean off this residue and finalise the surface. Below is a pic of one of the mounts after cleaning with the lint-free cloth. We then put together a custom adapter to be able to use the 3M 7333 2-part epoxy with a standard caulking gun. The adapter is simply a plate with two pieces of rod welded to it, along with some washers to spread the load, and a second plate to add reinforcing to the arrangement. Here's a couple of pics showing the design and assembly. While we were working on cleaning the RACP surfaces and building the caulking gun adapter the acid pickle was doing its work. With the pickling complete, we neutralised the acid with baking soda, and dried the plates. Next up was to apply the epoxy. We were pleasantly surprised at how well our gun adapter worked. Here's a photo of it being prepared for use. The epoxy nozzles are seriously cool, the way they're designed to mix the two parts of the epoxy completely really makes the whole process a lot quicker and easier. With the surfaces fully cleaned and prepared, the process we followed to epoxy each plate was as follows: 1: Apply epoxy to the plate, and spread using the supplied brush. We applied an even layer (The consistency of the epoxy makes it easy to spread, and makes the appropriate thickness fairly self-explanatory). Note that we didn't brush to the very edge of the mounting hole, as we wanted to ensure that we didn't end up with too much epoxy squeezing into the hole when we clamped the plate in place. 2: Apply epoxy to the RACP surface. Applying the epoxy to the vertical surfaces isn't too bad, it sticks pretty well and can then be spread by the brush. We found with the horizontal surfaces that it was best to follow the nozzle fairly closely with the brush, doing an initial spread of the epoxy as we went, to get it to stick to the surface and not drip. 3: Apply an extra bead of epoxy to the plate along large surface areas, etc. and in places where the may be a slightly larger gap (e.g. around curves, etc.). 4: Mate the plate to the RACP, and bolt it up (we partially greased the bolt thread, in case we had a lot of epoxy spillage into the bolt carrier. We were careful to not get the grease anywhere near the bonding surfaces). Note that we manufactured clamping plates out of 5mm sheet steel, to act as large "washers" and spread the clamping force of bolt out over the surface. 5: We then did the same with the rear mount on the same side (as we would add further clamping and bracing in pairs. 6: We then added additional bracing using strategically cut pieces of timber. 7: With the plates well clamped in place, we then removed the bolt for each plate in turn, and ensured that it wasn't going to end up getting epoxied in place from the epoxy that had been squeezed into the bolt carrier. Fortunately we'd judged the spread well, the epoxy and spread to the inner edge of the bolt hole, but hadn't pooled in the bolt carrier. We cleaned up the thread and re-greased the thread and tightened it back up. We also took the opportunity to clean up any epoxy that had leaked out beyond the bead, and we inserted sheet plastic between the 5mm clamping plates and the reinforcement plates, so that we didn't accidentally end up with things epoxied to other things they shouldn't be! :rofl3: And with that we were done! The plates are all epoxied, and clamped/wedged in place. We've got good beads all the way around on the plates, and not too much excessive spillage. We found the whole process easier and quicker than we were expecting. The 3M 7333 epoxy is really great to work with. The mixing nozzle is awesome, and the epoxy is easy to spread and work with. The long work time also helps a lot. :thumbsup2: The clamp time is 8 hours, but we're in no rush, so it will stayed clamped until some time tomorrow. Dad has been loosening and retightening the bolts every couple of hours just as an extra check - would be a shame to have a :facepalm: moment at this point! The epoxy turns purple when it's cured. When I left my parents place this evening the epoxy was already starting to turn purple Tomorrow will be more cleaning on the underbody, as well as clean up, seam sealing and undercoating the plates. Good day's work!
    3 likes
  50. Number six rolls off the production line. Another 330ti with ZF 5 spd and all 330 m sport suspension and brakes.
    3 likes